BNEF: Two Business Cycles to Prepare for A Low-Carbon World

This week, as delegates from nearly 200 nations congregate in Katowice for COP24, the 24th annual UNFCCC conference on climate change, ‘tis the season to take stock of the state of climate politics around the world. Spoiler alert, it’s not a particularly jolly read.

BNEF: Planes, Trains and Automobiles – the Electric Remake

In my article this March entitled Beyond Three Thirds, The Road to Deep Decarbonization, I referred to the vast opportunities that beckon in clean energy and transportation beyond the core markets of wind, solar, batteries and electric vehicles. Today I want to take a deep dive into commercial transportation, aviation, shipping and trains.

Prospect: ‘WannaCry’ the wake-up call we all needed – Time to get serious about cyber safety

The WannaCry ransomware attack, which hit the NHS hard and infected computers in over 150 countries, was a wake-up call. Our infrastructure is increasingly digital and connected—we need to get serious about protecting it…

The Telegraph: Londoners in 2050 won’t need cars. They’ll be living in an app-powered eco-capital

The success of London in 2050 will be measured by its environment. By this I don’t just mean the quality of its air, or whether it has retained its biodiversity, important though those are.

Energy Policy: Open source software and crowdsourcing for energy analysis

Informed energy decision making requires effective software, high-quality input data, and a suitably trained user community. Developing these resources can be expensive and time consuming. Even when data and tools are intended for public re-use they often come with technical, legal, economic and social barriers that make them difficult to adopt, adapt and combine for use in new contexts. We focus on the promise of open, publically accessible software and data as well as crowdsourcing techniques to develop robust energy analysis tools that can deliver crucial, policy-relevant insight, particularly in developing countries, where planning resources are highly constrained—and the need to adapt these resources and methods to the local context is high. We survey existing research, which argues that these techniques can produce high-quality results, and also explore the potential role that linked, open data can play in both supporting the modelling process and in enhancing public engagement with energy issues.